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Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts collection

 Collection
Identifier: W130

Scope and Content of the Collection

The Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts Collection consists of printed reports, training materials, and audiovisual recordings, as well as a few pieces of correspondence, 1989-2006. The contents primarily relate to women and minorities in the justice system, including topics such as domestic and sexual violence, family rights, diversity, and gender bias. Audiovisual recordings are VHS videotapes, with one DVD. The material accompanied a collection of monographs which has been cataloged separately.

Dates

  • 1989-2006

Creator

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

To quote in print, or otherwise reproduce in whole or in part in any publication, including on the Worldwide Web, any material from this collection, the researcher must obtain permission from (1) the owner of the physical property and (2) the holder of the copyright. Persons wishing to quote from this collection should consult the reference archivist to determine copyright holders for information in this collection. Reproduction of any item must contain the complete citation to the original. All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Historical Note about the Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts

The Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts, also referred to as simply the Administrative Office of the Courts (AOC), provides support and subject matter expertise on policy, court innovation, legislation, and court administration to all classes of courts. The AOC also furnishes a full range of information technology, budget and financial services to the judicial branch. Its purpose is to "provide valued professional service in support of Georgia's Judicial system."

Extent

0.83 Linear Feet (in 2 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Abstract:

The Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts provides support and subject matter expertise on policy, court innovation, legislation, and court administration to all classes of courts. Its collection consists of printed reports, training materials, and audiovisual recordings, as well as a few pieces of correspondence, 1989-2006. The contents primarily relate to women and minorities in the justice system.

Acquisition Information

Donated on behalf of the Administrative Office of the Courts by its director, Marla Moore, September 27, 2011.

Separated Materials

Separated to Women's Printed Collection: Spec Books, see online catalog for access

  1. 1991-92 public hearings on racial & ethnic bias in the California state court system.
  2. Annual Report. Olympia, Wash: Washington State Minority and Justice Commission, 2002.
  3. Becker, Barrie, and Peggy Hora. Judicial Considerations When Sentencing Pregnant Substance Users: A Project of the National Association of Women Judges. Washington, D.C: The Association, 1996.
  4. Biderman, Paul L. Report to the State Justice Institute on the First Year of Operation of the New Mexico Judicial Education Center. United States: State Justice Institute?, 1993.
  5. Biennial Report: 2003-2004. Olympia, Wash: Washington State Minority and Justice Commission, 2004.
  6. Bright, Stephen B. Promises to Keep: Achieving Fairness and Equal Justice for the Poor in Criminal Cases : a Preliminary Report on Georgia's Compliance with the Constitutions of Georgia and the United States in Providing Representation to Poor People Accused of Crimes. Atlanta, Ga.: The Center, 2000.
  7. Carter, Janet. Domestic Violence in Civil Court Cases: A National Model for Judicial Education. San Francisco, Calif.: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 1992.
  8. Carter, Janet, Candace Heisler, Nancy K. D. Lemon, and Anne Ganley. Domestic Violence: The Crucial Role of the Judge in Criminal Court Cases : a National Model for Judicial Education. San Francisco, Calif.: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 1991.
  9. Coates, Robert B, and Steven S. Alley. Evaluation of the Violence Intervention Program in Bernalillo County, New Mexico. Albuquerque, NM: National Resource Center for Youth Mediation, 2000.
  10. Creating a Victim Impact Panel for Diverted Youth: Manual of Operating Procedures. Seattle, Wash: The Partnership, 2000.
  11. Crossing Borders: Regional Meetings on Implementing Full Faith and Credit. Williamsburg, Va.: National Center for State Courts, 2004
  12. Cultural Competency and Native Women: A Guide for Non-Natives Who Advocate for Battered Women and Rape Victims. Rapid City, S.D: Sacred Circle, National Resource Center to End Violence Against Native Women, 2000.
  13. Darlow, Julia D. The Michigan Supreme Court Task Force on Gender Issues in the Courts: Conclusions and Recommendations.
  14. Dobbin, Shirley A, Howard N. Snyder, and Howard N. Snyder. Juvenile Violence: A Guide to Research. Reno, Nev: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, 1996.
  15. Equal Justice, Equal Treatment, Equal Opportunity: Appraising Change and Progress a Decade After the Report of the New York Task Force on Women in the Courts : a Report. New York: The Committee, 1996.
  16. Equal Justice: a Work in Progress. New York, N.Y: The Commission, 1997.
  17. Executive Summary with Status of Recommendations: Domestic Relations, Criminal Law, Civil Damage Awards, Courtroom Dynamics. Springfield, Il: The Task Force, 1990.
  18. Family Court Performance Standards and Measures. Wilmington, DE: Family Court of the State of Delaware, 1999.
  19. Family Violence: Effective Judicial Intervention. Washington, D.C: Women Judges' Fund for Justice, 1993.
  20. Family Violence: Improving Court Practice : Recommendations. Reno, Nev: The Council, 1990.
  21. The First Year Report of the New Jersey Supreme Court Task Force on Women in the Courts. S.l: s.n, 1984.
  22. Final Report of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Committee on Racial and Gender Bias in the Justice System. Harrisburg, Pa.?: Supreme Court of Pennsylvania?, 2003.
  23. Flango, Carol R, Victor E. Flango, and H T. Rubin. How Are Courts Coordinating Family Cases? Williamsburg, Va.: National Center for State Courts, 1999.
  24. Geiger, Maurice D. Beyond Their Reach: Rural Courts and Immigrant Communities = Fuera De Su Alcance : Los Tribunales Rurales Y Las Comunidades Inmigrantes. Montpelier, VT: Rural Justice Center, 2001. Print.
  25. The Georgia Justice System's Treatment of Adult Victims Of Sexual Violence: Some Problems and Some Proposed Solutions. Atlanta, Ga. : Supreme Court of Georgia, Commission on Equality, 2003.
  26. Hardy, James M. Managing for Impact in Nonprofit Organizations: Corporate Planning Techniques and Applications. Erwin, Tenn: Essex Press, 1984. Print.
  27. In the Best Interests of the Court, Children Come First: Improvements in the Juvenile Court System of the Circuit Court of Cook County, Illinois 1989 to 1997. Chicago, Ill.: Office of Chief Judge Donald P. O'Connell, Circuit Court of Cook County, 1998.
  28. The Janiculum Project Recommendations. Reno, NV: National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, 1998.
  29. McGarry, Peggy, and Becki Ney. Getting It Right: Collaborative Problem Solving for Criminal Justice. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Justice, National Institute of Corrections, 2006.
  30. McIntosh, Peggy. White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences Through Work in Women's Studies. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley College, Center for Research on Women, 1988.
  31. Medicine, Ethics, and the Law: Pre-conception to Birth. Washington, D.C: The Fund, 1991.
  32. Mickens, June. Toward a Common Goal: Tribal & State Intergovernmental Agreements for Child Support Cases. Washington, D.C: ABA Center on Children and the Law, 1994.
  33. Minnesota Supreme Court Advisory Task Force on the Juvenile Justice System Final Report. St. Paul, MN: Research and Planning Office, State Court Administration, Minnesota Supreme Court, 1994.
  34. Minnesota Supreme Court Task Force on Racial Bias in the Judicial System: Final Report. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Supreme Court, 1993.
  35. Model Training Curriculum for Judges and Staffs of Juvenile and Family Courts: Representative Payment and Kids. Washington, DC: Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly, American Bar Association, 2001.
  36. New Directions from the Field: Victims' Rights and Services for the 21st Century. Washington, D.C: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime, 1998.
  37. New Hampshire Statewide Conference on Juvenile Justice, Sheration Tara, Nashua, New Hampshire, March 19 and 20, 1998: [pre-conference Materials]. New Hampshire: New Hampshire District Court?, 1998.
  38. Pearson, Jessica, and Nancy Thoennes. Supervised Visitation: A Portrait of Programs and Clients. Denver, Colo: Center for Policy Research, 1997.
  39. Pierannunzi, Carol. Report to the Georgia Commission on Gender Bias in the Judicial System. Marietta, Ga: Kennesaw State College, 1990.
  40. Roehl, Jan. Self-evaluation Tool Kit for Juvenile Drug Courts. Pacific Grove, CA: Justice Research Center, 2002.
  41. Report of the Select Committee on Gender Equality of the Maryland Judiciary and the Maryland State Bar Association. Annapolis, Md.: The Committee, 1992.
  42. Samples, Faith L. Evaluation of the Implementation of the Juvenile Intervention Court Application: Harlem Community Justice Center Under the Auspices of the Center for Court Innovation. New York: New York State Unified Court System, 2003.
  43. Schafran, Lynn H, Claudia J. Bayliff, and Danielle Ben-Jehuda. Understanding Sexual Violence: The Judicial Response to Stranger and Nonstranger Rape and Sexual Assault. New York: The Program, 2005.
  44. State of Connecticut Judicial Branch Task Force on Minority Fairness: Executive Report. Hartford: Task Force, 1996.
  45. Supreme Court Commission on Equality Annual Report to the Supreme Court of Georgia 1996-1997. Atlanta, GA: Supreme Court Commission on Equality, 1997.
  46. Tennessee Domestic Abuse Benchbook. Nashville, Tenn.: The Council, 1996.
  47. Thomas, R R. Giraffe and Elephant: A Diversity Fable. Atlanta, GA: BAmerican Institute for Managing Diversity, 2001. Print.
  48. Violence Intervention Curriculum for Families. Albuquerque, NM: The Center, 2000.
  49. What's a Judge to Do?: Pregnant Substance Users and the Role of the Court : a Judicial Curriculum. Washington, D.C: Women Judges' Fund for Justice, 1993.
  50. Where the Injured Fly for Justice: Report and Recommendations of the Florida Supreme Court Racial and Ethnic Bias Study Commission. Tallahassee: The Court, 1990.
  51. Where the Injured Fly for Justice: Reforming Practices Which Impede the Dispensation of Justice to Minorities in Florida : Report and Recommendations of the Florida Supreme Court Racial and Ethnic Bias Study Commission. Tallahassee: The Court, 1991.
  52. Wilson, Ian R. G, and Juan D. Vera. Gender and Injustice: A Study of Gender Bias against Men in the U.s. Criminal Justice System. S.l.: Committee on Gender Bias in the Courts, National Coalition of Free Men, 1991.
  53. Women in the Courts: A Work in Progress: 15 Years After the Report of the New York Task Force on Women in the Courts. New York, NY: The Committee, 2002.

Processing Information

Processed by Hilary Morrish at the file level, 2014-15.
Title
Georgia Administrative Office of the Courts:
Subtitle
A Guide to Its Collection at Georgia State University Library
Status
Completed
Author
Hilary Morrish
Date
November 2014
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Revision Statements

  • February 2016: Revised by Hal Hansen

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
100 Decatur St., S.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404-413-2880
404-413-2881 (Fax)