Skip to main content

AFL-CIO Region 8 (Knoxville, Tenn.) and Region 5 records

 Collection
Identifier: L1985-38

Scope and Content of the Records

The AFL-CIO Region 5 and Region 8 records, spanning 1940 to 1974 but bulking between 1956 to 1974, include correspondence, reports, financial records, printed material and photographs. The collection pertains to the operation of the AFL-CIO regional offices in Knoxville, Tennessee, and Charlotte, North Carolina. These offices coordinated AFL-CIO activities in Region 5 (North Carolina and South Carolina), 1956-1964, under the direction of Carey E. Haigler, and in Region 8 (North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee), 1964-1974, under the direction of Paul R. Christopher. There are a few records, notably the activity and expense reports of Arthur J. Potter, assistant regional director of Region 8, pertaining to AFL-CIO activities in Kentucky, 1956-1963. The collection is arranged by function and organized in eight series.

Dates

  • 1940-1974
  • Majority of material found within 1956 - 1974

Creator

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

To quote in print, or otherwise reproduce in whole or in part in any publication, including on the Worldwide Web, any material from this collection, the researcher must obtain permission from (1) the owner of the physical property and (2) the holder of the copyright. Persons wishing to quote from this collection should consult the reference archivist to determine copyright holders for information in this collection. Reproduction of any item must contain the complete citation to the original. All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Biography of Paul R. Christopher

Paul Christopher was born February 14, 1910, in the Alice Mill Village in Easley, Pickens County, South Carolina. His father, Clarence Erasker Christopher, was a loom fixer and his mother, Mary Jane (Hemphill) Christopher, also worked in the Alice Mill. Young Christopher moved with his family to Greenville, South Carolina, was enrolled in a company grammar school (Poe Mill), and later attended Greenville's Parker District High School. At age fourteen, Christopher began work in the F.W. Poe Manufacturing Company, remaining in the mills (by his own account), at least six "cotton and rayon weaving mills" until 1933, except for a period from 1930 to 1932 when he attended Clemson Agricultural College (now University), studying textile engineering. Shortly after leaving Clemson, Christopher met and married Mary Elizabeth Lybrand on August 13, 1932.

Upon returning to the cotton mills as a weaver, Christopher joined the United Textile Workers of America (UTWA) and quickly rose from within the ranks to the presidency of his local. In 1933 he secured employment as a full-time organizer and technical advisor for the UTWA, a post which he held until April, 1937. During these years, Christopher participated in a host of organizing campaigns, boycotts, and strikes, including the 1934 General Textile Strike. In recognition of his organizing abilities and leadership qualities, the North Carolina Federation of Textile Workers elected him president in 1934.

When the Congress of Industrial Organizations left the American Federation of Labor and began massive organizing drives among America's industrial workers, Christopher lent his support as an organizer and technical advisor to the Textile Workers Organizing Committee (TWOC), chartered in 1937. After a two year organizing campaign, stymied by the "Roosevelt Recession," the TWOC was re-chartered as the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA), and Christopher was elected a national vice-president, a position he held until 1941, while serving concurrently as TWUA South Carolina State Director.

In September 1940, Christopher moved to Tennessee with his wife and two daughters, Sara Jane and Patricia Ellen, there becoming executive secretary-treasurer of the CIO-affiliated Tennessee Industrial Union Council. Christopher was made CIO Tennessee State Director in 1942, a post he retained until being appointed CIO Region 4 (Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia) Director in 1953. Throughout the 1940s, Christopher held many concurrent administrative positions within the state and regional CIO, including Acting Southeastern Director for the CIO-Political Action Committee (1944 - 1946) and Tennessee State Southern Organizing Committee State Director during the Southern Organizing Drive, popularly known as "Operation Dixie." Following the merger of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1955, Christopher was appointed Director of AFL-CIO Region 8 (Tennessee and Kentucky) and remained in that post until his death in early 1974. (In 1964 Region 8 was reorganized to include Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina.)

In addition to his career as a trade unionist, Christopher served in numerous social welfare agencies, educational organizations, and conferences and conventions covering a wide range of subjects. During World War II Christopher became associated with the following government agencies: Advisory Commission, Training-Within-Industry Division; War Manpower Commission, Region IX; Board of Directors, Tennessee War Fund; Tennessee War Services Council; Advisory Commission, Tennessee State Planning Commission; Knoxville (Tennessee) Area War Manpower Commission Labor Management Commission; National War Labor Board, Fourth (Southeast) Region; and Office of Price Administration Labor Advisory Committee.

Interested in labor education, Christopher was a member of the Board of Directors of the Southern Summer School for Workers and the Executive Council of the Highlander Folk School. His participation in community work included membership on the Board of Directors, Knox County Chapter of the American Red Cross and the Knoxville Community Chest. He belonged to a number of civil rights organizations, including the Southern Conference for Human Welfare and the Southern Regional Council. A Democratic Party member and Unitarian, Christopher also held membership in fraternal organizations such as the Elks, Moose, and Young Men's Christian Association. While serving in many capacities in governmental, educational, community, and church organizations not directly connected with his work as a trade union leader, Christopher pursued avocations as a stamp collector, ham radio operator, pilot, and "weekend" farmer.

Carey Elbert Haigler was born at Ensley Station, Birmingham, Alabama, on August 9, 1902. His father, Frank Hampton Haigler, moved in 1888 from Letohatchee, Alabama, where he was a farmer, to Birmingham, where he worked with the railroad, in construction, and in coal mining. Carey Haigler's mother was Mary Alma Zeigler Haigler from Fort Deposit, Alabama. Haigler married Sammie Louise Lusk in 1935; they had one son, Carey E. Haigler, Jr.

Haigler began work at age fifteen; between 1917 and 1934 he worked variously in coal and iron mining, the chemical industry, railroading, and steel making. Having joined the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel and Tin Workers, he served his local union as corresponding secretary from 1933 to 1935. In 1934 he was elected president of his local (now Steelworkers Local Union 1131) and was discharged from his company the next day. After eighteen months of unemployment, Haigler joined the Soil Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture where he remained until 1942. In February 1942 he began work as a field representative with the Steelworkers Organizing Committee which in May 1942 became the United Steelworkers of America, CIO. During the period 1942-1944, he served as Assistant Regional Director of the Alabama CIO, Secretary-Treasurer of the Alabama CIO Council, and President of the Alabama CIO Council. From 1944 to 1953 he worked as a Regional Director of the CIO and in 1946 added responsibilities as the Alabama State Director of the CIO Organizing Committee which is popularly known as "Operation Dixie." In 1953 Haigler became Field Assistant to the Executive Vice President of the CIO and served for a time as Acting National Director of the CIO Organizing Committee. With the AFL-CIO merger in December 1955, Haigler moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, and took over as Director of Region 5, AFL-CIO (North and South Carolina), holding that office until March 1964. At that time he became Assistant Regional Director of Region 8 with responsibility for North and South Carolina. Haigler retired from that office in July 1967.

Carey Haigler's other activities included the Regional War Labor Board, World War II Veterans State Educational Fund, Alabama Hospital Advisory Council, and the Alabama State Licensing Board for General Contractors.

Beginning in 1953, Paul Christopher, located in Knoxville, Tennessee, headed the CIO's Region 4 office with responsibilities for organizing activities in Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The merger of the AFL with the CIO in December 1955 brought the creation of AFL-CIO Region 8 which encompassed Tennessee and Kentucky. Christopher continued as Regional Director with Arthur J. Potter as Assistant Director in the sub-regional office in Louisville, Kentucky. Meanwhile, North and South Carolina came under AFL-CIO Region 5 with Carey Haigler as Regional Director in Charlotte, North Carolina. A March 1964 reorganization of the AFL-CIO regional structure placed Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina in Region 8 under Christopher. Haigler continued as Assistant Director in the sub-regional office in Charlotte. Kentucky's office under Arthur Potter was reassigned to Region 9. After Christopher's death in early 1974, Region 8 states were placed under Region 5 headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia.

The regional offices in Regions 5 and 8 employed several field representatives who would assist international union representatives in organizing activities. These agents included Melville Kress, B.T. Judd, Nicholas H. Kurko, Guy Phelps, and W. E. Roehl, all of whom worked in Tennessee; A. E. Brown, John R. Graham, Elijah L. Jackson, George Kiser, and Raymond J. Schnell worked in North Carolina; and Lloyd P. Vaugh focused on South Carolina. Other agents who also worked under Paul Christopher and Carey Haigler included Robert W. Christofferson, W.A. Copeland, Edward C. Gordon, Henry White, W.C. Burcham, Hollis Hales, Lewis F. Shipman, and Curtis Bullock. Many of these southern field representatives came from the old CIO organization and had worked in the CIO's "Operation Dixie." These included Melville Kress, B.T. Judd, Nicholas Kurko, Elijah Jackson, and Raymond J. Schnell. Elijah Jackson was a black organizer and was frequently asked to cultivate black workers. In 1966 Nicholas, originally a member of the Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, became director of AFL-CIO Region 6 in Texas. By the late 1960's and early 1970s, the AFL-CIO Organization Department was cutting back on the number of regional field representatives. For example, Melville Kress retired in 1971 and was not replaced. Christopher wrote Haigler that at that time the staff was short thirty field representatives.

Extent

25.4 Linear Feet (in 65 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Abstract:

In 1955 when the American Federation of Labor (AFL) and the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) merged, it created AFL-CIO Region 8 encompassing Tennessee and Kentucky with Paul Christopher as Director. North and South Carolina became part of Region 5 directed by Carey Haigler. The 1964 reorganization of the AFL-CIO placed Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina in Region 8 with Christopher as Director and Haigler as Assistant Director. After Christopher's death in 1974, Region 8 states were placed under Region 5 with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. The collection consists of records of AFL-CIO Region 8 (Knoxville, Tenn.) and Region 5 (Charlotte, N.C.) from 1940-1974.

Acquisition Information

Donated by the George Meany Archives, October 1985.

Related Archival Materials

Related Materials in This Repository

  1. Harry T. Barber papers, 1966-1973 (L1978-12)
  2. Oliver Singleton papers, 1946-1971 (L1972-83)
  3. AFL-CIO Region 6 (Atlanta office) records, 1961-1969 (L1974-01)
  4. AFL-CIO Region 5 (Atlanta office) records, 1947-1981 (L1982-38)
  5. AFL-CIO Region 5 (Atlanta office) records, 1976-1978 (L1985-15)
  6. AFL-CIO Region V records, 1964-1993 (L1990-05)
  7. AFL-CIO Region 8 records, 1933-1969 (L1974-15)
  8. AFL-CIO Region 8 records, 1930-1974 (L1984-70)
  9. AFL-CIO Region 8 (Knoxville, Tenn.) and Region 5 records, 1940-1974 (L1985-38)

Separated Materials

During processing, some material was separated to other Southern Labor Archives collections.

For pamphlets, see the Southern Labor Archives Pamphlet Collection finding aid (note that this collection has been weeded over time). For periodicals, see the Southern Labor Archives periodicals collection finding aid or catalog. For photographs, see the Southern Labor Archives Photographs Collection finding aid. For artifacts, proceedings, constitutions, or contracts, consult Special Collections for access.

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Photographic Collection

  1. 7 snapshots, 6 negatives, Bakery and Confectioners Workers, Local 503, strike against Krispy Kreme, undated
  2. 7 negatives, unidentified
  3. 5 snapshots, 12 negatives, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Charlotte, NC, 1957

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Artifacts Collection

  1. Bumper Sticker: "Register: Vote for Labor's Friends"
  2. Union Labels, International Plate Printers, `Die Stampers' and Engravers' Union of North America, undated

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Proceedings Collection

  1. America Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1957; 1971
  2. Congress of Industrial Organizations, 1953; 1954
  3. North Carolina State AFL-CIO, 1969
  4. South Carolina Federation of Labor, 1955; 1956
  5. South Carolina Labor Council, circa 1962; circa 1964

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Constitutions Collection

  1. Aiken [SC] Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, 1957
  2. Alabama CIO Council, April 1955
  3. Aluminum Workers International Union, AFL, 1953
  4. American Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union, AFL-CIO, 1962
  5. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), December 1957
  6. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), Directly Affiliated Local Unions, February 1960
  7. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), Local Central Bodies, June 1956
  8. American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), State Central Bodies, June 1956
  9. Anderson [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, circa August 1971
  10. Barbers' and Beauty Culturists' Union of America, CIO, July 1952
  11. United Brick and Clay Workers of America, November 1954
  12. Bricklayers, Masons and Platerers' International Union of America, September 1968
  13. National Association of Broadcast Employees, CIO, July 1955
  14. Building Service Employees' International Union, AFL, May 1950
  15. Catawba [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, undated
  16. United Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers International Union, AFL, January 1955
  17. Greater Charleston [SC] Industrial Union Council, CIO, undated
  18. Greater Charleston [SC] Labor Council AFL-CIO, undated
  19. Charlotte [NC] Labor Council AFL-CIO, undated
  20. International Chemical Workers Union, AFL-CIO. Local Union Constitution and Bylaws, 1958
  21. Cigar Makers' International Union of America, AFL, January 1953
  22. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, January 1955
  23. Coastal Plains Labor Council, AFL-CIO, October 1971
  24. Greater Columbia Central Labor Union AFL-CIO, March 1973
  25. Coopers' International Union of North America, AFL, April 1955
  26. International Union of Elevator Constructors, AFL, November 1951
  27. Flight Engineers' International Association, AFL, February 1953
  28. American Federation of Technical Engineers, AFL-CIO, 1971
  29. Greater Fayetteville [NC] Labor Council, AFL-CIO, undated
  30. American Flint Glass Workers' Union of North America AFL, September 1955
  31. United Furniture Workers of America, AFL-CIO, (2) May 1958; May 1960
  32. Georgetown [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, undated
  33. Glass Bottle Blowers Association of the United States and Canada, AFL-CIO, 1957
  34. American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO, August 1958
  35. American Federation of Grain Millers, AFL-CIO, Local No. 318, undated
  36. Greenville [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, undated
  37. International Handbag, Luggage, Belt and Novelty Workers Union, AFL, July 1954
  38. United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union, AFL, June 1953
  39. International Hod Carriers' Building and Common Laborers' Union of America (2), October 1953; October 1956
  40. American Federation of Hosiery Workers, AFL, March 1953
  41. Hotel and Restaurant Employees and Bartenders International Union, AFL-CIO, June 1953
  42. Insurance Workers of America, AFL-CIO, 1955
  43. International Jewelry Workers' Union, AFL-CIO, May 1962
  44. International Association of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, AFL, October 1952
  45. Johnson City [TN] Area Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, undated
  46. Laundry and Dry Cleaning International Union, AFL-CIO, May 1958
  47. Leather Workers International Union, CIO, November 1955
  48. Amalgamated Lithographers of America, CIO, 1954
  49. International Brotherhood of Longshoremen, AFL-CIO, July 1957
  50. International Association of Machinists, AFL-CIO, April 1958
  51. Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees, June 1955
  52. Industrial Union of Marine and Shipbuilding Workers of America, CIO, October 1952
  53. Mecklenburg [NC] County Industrial Union Council, CIO (2), undated
  54. Mecklenburg [NC] County Industrial Union Council, CIO, "Proposed Constitutional Changes," undated
  55. Memphis [TN] AFL-CIO Labor Council, November 1972
  56. American Federation of Musicians, AFL, 1955
  57. Newberry, Laurens and Fairfield [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, October 1966
  58. North Carolina Labor Council, AFL-CIO (agreement for the merger and proposed constitution of North Carolina State Federation of Labor and the North Carolina State Industrial Council), January 1956
  59. NC: North Carolina State AFL-CIO (housed in one folder), late 1950s
  60. DALU # 23246 Public Safety Service Employees, AFL-CIO, Fontana Dam, NC
  61. Asheville Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  62. Charlotte Labor Council AFL-CIO, April 1957
  63. Durham Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, 1957
  64. Greensboro Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, October 1957
  65. Haywood County Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  66. High Point Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  67. Plymouth Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  68. Raleigh Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, 1957
  69. Salisbury-Spencer Central Labor Union
  70. Tri-County Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  71. Central Labor Union of Wilmington
  72. Winston-Salem Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO
  73. North Carolina State AFL-CIO, (2) March 1960; September 1972
  74. North Carolina State Industrial Union Council, CIO, November 1953
  75. Office Employees International Union, AFL, June 1955
  76. Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers International Union, October 1959
  77. United Papermakers and Paperworkers, AFL-CIO, March 1957
  78. Pee Dee [SC] Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO (2), undated; 1966
  79. International Plate Printers, Die Stampers and Engravers Union of North America, May 1956
  80. United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of the United States and Canada, AFL-CIO, September 1951
  81. National Postal Transport Association, 1951-1953
  82. The Order of Railroad Telegraphers, AFL, 1952
  83. Brotherhood Railway Carmen of America, AFL, September 1954
  84. Retail Clerks International Association, AFL, June 1955
  85. Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, CIO, May 1954
  86. Rocky Mountain Labor School, undated
  87. United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and Plastics Workers of America, Local 24884, AFL-CIO, Salisbury, N.C., February 1957
  88. Scientific, Professional and Cultural Employees Council of AFL-CIO Unions, 1967
  89. Seafarers' International Union of North America, AFL, June 1955
  90. South Carolina Federation of Labor, AFL, 1953
  91. South Carolina State Industrial Union Council - CIO (South Carolina CIO Council), May 1955
  92. South Carolina Labor Council, Agreement for the merger of the South Carolina Federation of Labor and the South Carolina State Industrial Union Council, AFL-CIO (annotated) (2), 1956
  93. South Carolina Labor Council AFL-CIO, (2) undated; 1964
  94. South Carolina Labor Council AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education, circa 1955
  95. Southern Labor School, AFL-CIO, January 1957
  96. Central Labor Union of Spartanburg [SC], AFL-CIO, undated
  97. National Association of Special Delivery Messengers (of the U.S. Postal Service), AFL, August 1952
  98. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO, May 1965
  99. American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO, Local 984, Charlotte, North Carolina, City Employees, undated
  100. United Steelworkers of America, International Union Elections Manual, AFL-CIO, August 1968
  101. United Steelworkers of America, AFL-CIO, (2) September 1956; September 1966
  102. International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union of North America, AFL, February 1955
  103. United Stone and Allied Products Workers of America, AFL-CIO, October 1958
  104. Journeymen Stone Cutters Association of North America, AFL, July 1946
  105. Stove Mounters International Union of North America, AFL, 1953
  106. Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employes of America, September 1955
  107. Switchmen's Union of North America, AFL, June 1955
  108. American Federation of Teachers, August 1955
  109. American Federation of Teachers: AFL-CIO, January 1958; September 1970
  110. The Commercial Telegraphers' Union, AFL-CIO, 1955
  111. Tennessee Labor Council, AFL-CIO (proposed constitution for the merged state organization [Tennessee Federation of Labor and Tennessee State Industrial Union Council]) (2 versions), December 1955
  112. Tennessee State Labor Council, AFL-CIO (2), September 1971; March 1973
  113. Textile Workers Union of America, CIO, May 1954
  114. United Textile Workers of America, AFL, September 1954
  115. International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes and Moving Picture Machine Operators of the United States and Canada, AFL, August 1952
  116. Tobacco Workers International Union, AFL, September 1952
  117. United Transport Service Employees, CIO, 1952
  118. Transport Workers Union of America, CIO, February 1955
  119. Utility Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO, April 1956
  120. Western Piedmont Central Labor Union, AFL-CIO, undated
  121. Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union, AFL-CIO, December 1955
  122. International Woodworkers of America, AFL-CIO, November 1955

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Contracts Collection

  1. International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of America, Local 1010; with Lycoming Division of Avco Corporation, Stratford, Connecticut, 1964
  2. International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers of America, Local 167; with Security Mills, Inc., Knoxville, Tennessee, 1973
  3. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Furniture Workers Division, Local 3110; with Morgan Manufacturing Inc., Black Mountain, North Carolina, 1957
  4. International Chemical Workers Union, Local 295; with Thermoid Company, Trenton, New Jersey, 1956
  5. International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; with Bowaters Southern Paper Corporation, [see International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers], 1965-1968
  6. International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 1592; with Northeast Rebuilders, Inc., Mill Hall, Pennsylvania, 1969
  7. International Union of Elevator Constructors, Local 80; Greensboro-Winston-Salem, North Carolina, undated
  8. International Union of Guards, Watchmen and Security Employees, Local 104; with Wells Fargo Armored Service Corporation, Nashville, Tennessee, 1969
  9. International Molders and Allied Workers Union, Local 352; with Draper Division, East Spartanburg Plant of North American Rockwell Corporation, Spartanburg, North Carolina, 1968
  10. United Papermakers and Paperworkers; with Bowaters Southern Paper Corporation, [see Union Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers], 1965-1968
  11. United Papermakers and Paperworkers; with Forest Products Division, Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation, Paper Mill Plant No. 31, West Monroe, Louisiana, 1960
  12. International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers; with Bowaters Southern Paper Corporation, 1965-1968
  13. Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local 557; with K-Mart, Knoxville, Tennessee, 1969
  14. United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and Plastic Workers of America, Local 186; with Auto Supply Warehouse, Firestone Tire and Rubber Company, Memphis, Tennessee, 1956
  15. United Rubber, Cork, Linoleum and Plastics Workers of America, Local 24884; with Carolina Rubber Hose Company, Salisbury, North Carolina, 1956
  16. Sheet Metal Workers International Association, Local 159; with Crown Aluminum Industries Corporation, Roxboro, North Carolina, 1966
  17. United Steelworkers of America; with Colonial Plant, Vanadium-Alloys Steel Company, Division of Vasco Metals Corporation, Monaca, Pennsylvania, 1965
  18. International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, Locals 22, 23, 61, 71, 322, 391, 509, 592, 822; with Pet Incorporated Dairy division, Johnson City, Tennessee, 1966
  19. International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of America, Local 23; with Pet Dairy Products, Johnson City, Tennessee, 1959

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Pamphlets Collection (This collection has been weeded over time)

  1. Pamphlets on the following topics: Aging, Alcoholism, American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations, American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations - Appalachian Council, Apprenticeship, Arbitration, Banking, Benefits, Campaign Finance Law, Civil Rights, Collective Bargaining, Communications Workers of America, Communism, Congress, Consumers, Credit Union, Democracy, Democratic Party, Drug Industry, Economic Issues, Economic Stabilization, Education, Employment, Fair Labor Standards Act, Farm Workers, Fire Fighters Working Conditions, Fund for the Republic, American Federation of Government Employees,Health Care, Sidney Hillman Foundation, Immigration, Insurance Plans, International Affairs, Job Satisfaction, J.P. Stevens, Labor Laws, Labor-Management Relations, Labor Management in the Federal Service, Labor Relations, Labor Studies, Multinational Corporations, United Mine Workers, District 50, National Labor Relations Board, American Newspaper Guild, Organizing, Pension Plans, Political Action, Political Issues, Politicians, Poverty, A. Philip Randolph Institute, Religion and Labor, Retirement, Right-to-Work, Seafarers International Union, Social Security, Strikes, Taxes, Income, American Federation of Teachers,Textile Workers, Textile Workers Union of America, Trade, Unemployment, Unemployment Insurance, Union, Directories, Union, Principles, United States Department of Labor: Labor-Management Service, United States Department of Labor: Administration,Urban Affairs, Wages, Workers' Compensation

Separated to Southern Labor Archives Periodicals Collection

  1. AFL-CIO Education News and Views, AFL-CIO Department of Education, October 1957 (Vol. 2, No. 10)
  2. AFL-CIO Free Trade Union News, AFL-CIO Department of International Affairs: 1969 (10 issues)
  3. The Asbestos Worker, International Association of Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, May 1964 (Vol XVI, No. 7)
  4. CIO World Affairs Bulletin, Congress of Industrial Organizations, September-October 1953 (Vol. II, No. 6)
  5. The Elevator Constructor, International Union of Elevator Constructors, April 1956 (Volume LIII, No. 4)
  6. Engineers Outlook, American Federation of Technical Engineers, AFL-CIO: 1969-1973 (17 issues)
  7. Interface, Council of AFL-CIO Unions for Scientific, Professional and Cultural Employees, Summer 1972 (Volume 1, Number 2)
  8. Labor Today, United Southern Employees Association, Inc., December 1956
  9. The Lather, Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union, March 1956 (Vol. LVI, No. 7)
  10. Maritime, AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department, May 1967 (Volume 1, Number 5)
  11. Memo from COPE, AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education: 1969 (26 issues)
  12. NF Digest, National Foundation of Health, Welfare and Pension Plans, Inc., June 1970 (Vol. 7, No. 5)
  13. NF Legal-Legislative Reporter News Bulletin, National Foundation of Health, Welfare and Pension Plans, Inc.: April 1970; November 1973
  14. NUPO News, AFL-CIO National Union of Police Officers, Division of Service Employees International Union, May 1973 (Volume 2, No. 3)
  15. Nation's Labor, J.S.V. Corporation, Jay Victor, Editor and Publisher, June 1972 (Vol. II, No. 6)
  16. The North Carolina Federationist, North Carolina State AFL-CIO, June 1957 (Volume 21, No. 1)
  17. The Public Employee, AFL-CIO American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees: October; December 1957; January 1958
  18. Stove Mounters and Range Workers Journal, Stove Mounters' International Union of North America, January/February/March 1956 (Vol. LXI, No. 1)
  19. Textile Labor, Textile Workers Union of America, AFL-CIO, June 1972 (Vol XXXIII, No. 6)
  20. Waterfront News, New York IBL [International Brotherhood of Longshoremen] Longshore Committee, AFL-CIO, April 13, 1956 (Vol. 2, No. 30)

Processing Information

Processed by Lee Sayrs, Anne L. Tilden, and Robert C. Dinwiddie at the file level.
Title
AFL-CIO Region 5 and Region 8 (Atlanta and Knoxville offices) [accession L1985-38]:
Subtitle
A Guide to Their Records at Georgia State University Library
Status
Completed
Author
Georgia State University Library
Date
May 2001
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Revision Statements

  • May 2001: EAD finding aid created by Apex Data Services.
  • 2007: EAD revised by William Hardesty.

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
100 Decatur St., S.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404-413-2880
404-413-2881 (Fax)