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Highlander Center collection

 Collection
Identifier: L2021-08

  • Staff Only

Scope and Contents of the Collection

The Highlander Center Collection, 1942-2003, consists of labor pamphlets, curriculum material, periodicals and publications. The majority covers occupational safety and health issues such as enviromental hazards, workplace diseases like brown lung, and training materials to ensure worker safety. Most files are generaly applicible to all trades, but there are also materials created for or by specific industries and their unions including the Sheet Metal Workers, Meat Workers, Furniture Workers, and various textile workers unions.

Dates

  • 1942-2003

Creator

Restrictions on Access

Collection is open for research use.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Georgia State University is the owner of the physical collection and makes reproductions available for research, subject to the copyright law of the United States and item condition. Georgia State University may or may not own the rights to materials in the collection. It is the researcher's responsibility to verify copyright ownership and obtain permission from the copyright holder before publication, reproduction, or display of the materials beyond what is reasonable under copyright law. Researchers may quote selections from the collection under the fair use provision of copyright law.

Historical Note

The Highlander Research and Education Center, formerly known as the Highlander Folk School, is a social justice leadership training school and cultural center in New Market, Tennessee. Founded in 1932 by activist Myles Horton, educator Don West, and Methodist minister James A. Dombrowski, it was originally located in the community of Summerfield in Grundy County, Tennessee, between Monteagle and Tracy City. Highlander provides training and education for emerging and existing movement leaders throughout the South, Appalachia, and the world. Some of Highlander's earliest contributions were during the labor movement in Appalachia and throughout the Southern United States. During the 1950s, it played a critical role in the American Civil Rights Movement. It trained civil rights leader Rosa Parks prior to her historic role in the Montgomery bus boycott, as well as providing training for many other movement activists, including members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Septima Clark, Anne Braden, Martin Luther King, Jr., James Bevel, Hollis Watkins, Bernard Lafayette, Ralph Abernathy and John Lewis in the mid- and-late 1950s. Backlash against the school's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement led to the school's closure by the state of Tennessee in 1961. Staff reorganized and moved to Knoxville, Tennessee, where they rechartered Highlander under the name "Highlander Research and Education Center." Highlander has been in its current (and longest consecutive) home in New Market, Tennessee, since 1971.

Extent

4 Linear Feet (in 4 boxes)

Language of Materials

English

Abstract

The Highlander Center Collection, 1942-2003, consists of labor pamphlets, curriculum material, periodicals and publications. The Highlander Research and Education Center, formerly known as the Highlander Folk School, is a social justice leadership training school and cultural center in New Market, Tennessee.

Acquisition Information

Donated by the Highlander Folk Center, courtesy of Susan Williams, August 2021.

Processing Information

Processed by Hal Hansen, August 2021.

Title
Highlander Center:
Subtitle
A Guide to the Collection at Georgia State University Library
Status
Completed
Author
Hal Hansen
Date
September 2021
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the Special Collections Repository

Contact:
100 Decatur St., S.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404-413-2880
404-413-2881 (Fax)